International code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes
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International code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes

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Published by World Health Organization in Geneva .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Infant Nutrition Physiology.,
  • Bottle Feeding.,
  • Breast Feeding.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementWorld Health Organization
ContributionsWorld Health Organization.
The Physical Object
Pagination36 p. ;
Number of Pages36
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17839798M

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The World Health Assembly adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes in to protect and promote breastfeeding, through the provision of adequate information on appropriate infant feeding and the regulation of the marketing of breastmilk substitutes, bottles and teats. In subsequent years additional resolutions have further defined and strengthened the Code. Presents a code developed jointly by WHO and UNICEF for the marketing of breast-milk substitutes. The code applies to the marketing of breast-milk substitutes including infant formula and other milk products foods and beverages including bottle-fed complementary foods when marketed or otherwise represented to be suitable for use as a partial or total replacement of breast milk.5/5(1). International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes Annex 1. Resolutions of the Executive Board at its sixty-seventh session and of the Thirty-fourth World Health Assembly on the on the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes Annex 2. Resolution of the Thirty-third World Health Assembly on infant and young child feeding. The WHO International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes: History and Analysis [Shubber, Sami] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The WHO International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes: History and Analysis5/5(1).

Summary of WHO/UNICEF International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes AIM: The Code aims to protect and promote breastfeeding by ensuring appropriate marketing and distribution of breastmilk substitutes. SCOPE: The Code applies to breastmilk substitutes, when marketed or otherwise represented as a partial or total replacement for breastmilk.   In , the evidence of the harmful effects of breast-milk substitutes promotion on the health and survival of infants was published in a book, called The Baby Killer (6), which gave impetus to the movement to control the promotion of breast-milk substitutes. International code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes. Geneva: World Health Organization ; Albany, N.Y.: Obtainable from WHO Publications Centre, (OCoLC) The World Health Organization (WHO) International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes (the Code) was adopted in by the World Health Assembly. [ 1, 2 ] It was designed to protect and promote breastfeeding and to ensure the proper use of breast milk substitutes when they are necessary.

The Code is a set of recommendations to regulate the marketing of breast-milk substitutes, feeding bottles and teats. The Code aims to stop the aggressive and inappropriate marketing of breast-milk substitutes. The 34th session of the World Health Assembly (WHA) adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes in as. compliance with the international code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes What is the Code? The Code was adopted in by the World Health Assembly to promote safe and adequate nutrition for infants, by the protection and promotion of breastfeeding and by ensuring the proper use of breast-milk substitutes, when these are necessary.   On 21 May the WHO International Code of Marketing Breast Milk Substitutes (hereafter referred to as the Code) was passed by votes to 1, the US casting the sole negative vote. The Code arose out of concern that the dramatic increase in mortality, malnutrition and diarrhoea in very young infants in the developing world was associated Cited by: The International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes, adopted by the World Health Assembly in , and subsequent relevant WHA resolutions adopted since then (the “Code”) are an important part of creating an overall environment that enables mothers to make the best possible feeding choice, based on impartial information and free of commercial influences, and to be fully.